Machine Learning Identifies New Brain Network Signature of Major Depression

“Using machine learning, researchers have identified novel, distinct patterns of coordinated activity between different parts of the brain in people with major depressive disorder—even when different protocols are used to detect these brain networks. Ayumu Yamashita of Advanced Telecommunications Research Institutes International in Kyoto, Japan, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Biology.”

How to Keep the Pandemic from Stealing your Holiday Cheer

There’s so much to celebrate during the month of December. Multicultural celebrations of Hanukkah, Christmas and Kwanzaa incorporate timeless rituals passed down for generations. The winter solstice marks the shortest day and longest night of the year. And December marks Bodhi Day for Buddhists–the day the Buddha (which means Awakened One) sat under a tree until he rose enlightened. For some, pandemic restrictions have cast a cloud over these sacred and fun celebrations.

Highly-visual social media and internalizing symptoms in adolescence: The mediating role of body image concerns

“Highly-visual social media (HVSM), such as Instagram and Snapchat, have experienced a significant increase in popularity among adolescents in recent years. Findings indicate use of social media is related to body image concerns and poorer mental health in adolescence.

However, previous research on HVSM is scant and mainly focus on female samples. In this view, the present study investigated the association between time spent on HVSM, body image concerns and internalizing symptoms, in sample of adolescents attending grades 6–11 in Northern Italy. Data for this study were based on 523 students, 54.2% female; Mean age (SD) = 14.82 (1.52).

Multiple linear regression was used to examine the associations between time spent using social media, body image concerns, and internalizing symptoms.

Teens who spend more time in extracurricular activities and less time in front of screens have better mental health, study finds

“If you’re worried about your kids’ mental health, particularly because of the Covid-19 pandemic and social distancing mandates, less screen time and more extracurricular activities will help, says a new study.

Adolescents — especially girls — who spend more time in extracurricular activities and less than two hours of screen time after school have better mental health, according to a study from the University of British Columbia and published in the journal Preventive Medicine.

CBT Corrects Brain Abnormality in Patients with OCD

Researchers have discovered a brain abnormality in people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) that may help predict which patients are most likely to respond to treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), according to a study published online in Brain Imaging and Behavior.

“The hemodynamic response function (HRF) represents the transfer function linking neural activity with the functional MRI (fMRI) signal, modeling neurovascular coupling,” wrote Jamie Feusner, MD, professor-in-residence of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at University of California – Los Angeles Health Sciences, and coauthors. “Since HRF is influenced by non-neural factors, to date it has largely been considered as a confound or has been ignored in many analyses.