Eating Disorders

Feeding and eating disorders are characterized by rigid and extreme eating behaviors that significantly impair physical or psychosocial functioning.

Feeding and eating disorders are characterized by rigid and extreme eating behaviors that significantly impair physical or psychosocial functioning. Some eating disorders also involve a preoccupation with body shape and weight. These disorders include the following:

Pica is defined as persistent eating of nonfood and non-nutritive products (e.g., paper, soap, cloth, wool, chalk) that is not consistent with the developmental level of the individual. Childhood onset is most common, however, children, adolescents, and adults can exhibit symptoms.

Rumination disorder is characterized by repeated regurgitation of food over at least a one month period. The regurgitation is not related to a fear of gaining weight or concerns about body image. Regurgitation is also not better explained by a medical condition or another feeding or eating disorder. Rumination disorder can be diagnosed in children, adolescents, and adults.

Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder is characterized by failure to meet appropriate nutritional or energy needs due to lack of interest in eating or food, avoidance of certain characteristics of food, and/or concern about consequences of eating (e.g., fear of choking). This disorder is more common in children than in adults, and may include significant weight loss, dependence on oral nutritional supplements, and/or significant nutritional deficiency.

Anorexia Nervosa is defined as an intense fear of gaining weight and refusal to maintain a minimally normal body weight. A distorted body image, or a significant misperception of body shape and size, is also a feature of this disorder. Anorexia Nervosa is characterized by restriction of food intake and/or fasting, low weight, and potentially other methods of weight loss, such as self-induced vomiting, the misuse of laxatives, or excessive exercise.

Bulimia Nervosa is characterized by preoccupation with shape and weight and repeated episodes of binge-eating followed by compensatory behavior. Compensatory behaviors may include self-induced vomiting, misuse of laxatives or diuretics, fasting, and/or excessive exercise. Binge-eating is defined as consuming a quantity of food that is larger than most individuals would eat in a discrete period of time, as well as a sense of lack of control during the binge episode.

Binge-eating disorder is defined as recurrent episodes of binge eating that leads to marked distress. Binge-eating episodes may be associated with eating much faster than normal, eating until uncomfortably full, eating large amounts of food when not physically hungry, eating alone due to embarrassment about the quantity of food intake, and/or feeling disgusted, depressed, or guilty after the binge eating episode. Binge-eating is defined as consuming a quantity of food that is larger than most individuals would eat in a discrete period of time, as well as a sense of lack of control during the binge episode.

CBT/DBT Associates offers individual CBT and comprehensive DBT for adults and adolescents with eating disorders. We also offer a CBT group for adults with disordered eating behaviors. The determination of the appropriateness of CBT vs. DBT is based on the nature of other difficulties that the individual is struggling with.

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